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View a list version of the Registration Calendar here or select Academic & Registration Deadlines or the desired quarter (Fall Registration Deadlines, Winter Registration Deadlines, etc.) from the categories below.

Download a printable 2017-18 academic calendar with holidays here.
Download a printable 2018-19 and 2019-2020 academic calendar with holidays here.

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Chuckanut Radio Hour with poet Frances McCue

We're excited to welcome poet Frances McCue to the Chuckanut Radio Hour to discuss her book "Timber Curtain." McCue’s new book is a poetry narrative that traces the loss of an old building in Seattle and charts an artist’s dialogue with erasure and gentrification. Charles D’Ambrosio calls it “a Northwest Classic.” McCue was also a faculty member at the 2018 Chuckanut Writers Conference. McCue is a wry and intelligent commentator on changing Seattle. Her insights will resonate with long-time residents of Bellingham.

"Timber Curtain" occupies a space between ramshackle and remodel. It starts with the demolition of a house―Richard Hugo House, the Seattle literary center where McCue worked and lived. The poems were originally written as narration for McCue’s documentary Where the House Was, but these cinematic poems engage with the material on the page and the fantastical, interwoven vision as only a book can. The speaker is plainspoken, oracular, indicting, and hopeful. Like the Seattle skyline, poems erase and recombine, censored but bleeding through into a landscape forever saturated with ghosts.

Frances McCue is a poet, essayist, reviewer and arts instigator. From 1996-2006, she was the founding director of Richard Hugo House in Seattle. In 2011, McCue became the first writer to win the Washington State Book Award for one book (THE BLED, a poetry collection) and place as a finalist for a second book (THE CAR THAT BROUGHT YOU HERE STILL RUNS). THE BLED also won the Grub Street National Book Prize and was a finalist for the Pacific Northwest Book Award.
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